IVF

Vocal Fry Stroboscopy

Happy Vocal Fryday! Here’s to another installment in Interesting Voice Facts!

As I was going through my research on vocal fry, I’ve found tons of interesting comments, studies, and theories. Along with it, I’ve found one short video of the vocal folds at work with fry.

Welcome to the world of stroboscopies! A camera is used on a patient, either through the nose or mouth, and it allows for a visualization of the folds themselves. In this case, the patient sings with both vocal fry and normal phonation, allowing us to see the difference.

Thank you to the Osborne Head and Neck Institute for this informative and interesting video! If you’re interested in seeing more, many other stroboscopies can be found on Youtube and elsewhere on the web.

If you haven’t yet listened to Vocalogical’s first episode on vocal fry, it can be found here: http://vocalogical.com/vocal-fry-part-1/

There’s more great stuff on fry coming your way! The second episode will be released this coming Wednesday!

Happy singing!

 

 

IVF

Larynx Ossification

It’s interesting to note that the larynx goes through ossification. 

Welcome to Interesting Voice Facts (IVF)! As I read through new material, every once in a while I stumble on something that I find very fascinating. This IVF is that as the larynx ages, it ossifies, which is a fancy way to say that all of the cartilages in the throat begin to turn to bone. When I thought about it, it made sense. After all, muscles and the body as a whole begin to lose tone and flexibility, which means cartilage would as well. The shocking part was how young it began. Sources say the cartilage in your larynx could ossify as early as the age of eighteen. 

What shocked me about this was knowing that many singers are in their vocal prime in the late twenties/early thirties, with some singers being able to sing well into their nineties like a pro. I assumed this rigid change in the vocal mechanism would bring about some negative changes to the voice. If this were true, however, the vocal prime wouldn’t be as late as it is. Actually, many attribute this change to be the reason why singers in their twenties, thirties, and beyond, could attain such beauty, range, and power.

Who knew your larynx changing to bone could be a good thing! There is tons of information on this topic, and one that will definitely be covered within a podcast. Pros and cons, research, and many more specifics will be discussed. For now, think of this idea of larynx ossification and more information will be coming to you soon!